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 WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW IF YOU OR  SOMEONE YOU KNOW IS HAVING A  STROKE

 

Use the letters in "fast" to spot stroke signs and know when to call 9-1-1.

FACE DROOPING

Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. Is the person's smile uneven or lopsided?

ARM WEAKNESS

Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

SPEECH DIFFICULTY

Is speech slurred? Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like "The sky is blue." Is the person able to correctly repeat the words?

TIME TO CALL 9-1-1

If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and say, "I think this is a stroke" to help get the person to the hospital immediately. Time is important! Don't delay, and also note the time when the first symptoms appeared. Emergency responders will want to know.

http://www.strokeassociation.org

PUBLIC EDUCATION 

 

 

 

 Lots of people drown each year because their cars become submerged underwater in a crash and they cannot get out. This is something that needs to change, could you get out of an underwater car?

This is a lot harder than you would think, Geoff Fahringer an expert diver says that there is not enough time for rescuers to reach you in situations like this, you have to be able to save yourself. The small amount of time you have before the vehicle becomes completely submerged should be the time that you make your escape.

Wasting your time trying to call 911 or things like they won’t do you any good if you’re still trapped inside the vehicle, you would think this would be common sense but it is something people do quite commonly. In the video below Fahringer demonstrates what you need to do in order to get out of a vehicle when it is sinking.

Please pay close attention to this video and if ever in the situation implement it into your life. Don’t become another number, be prepared. This knowledge could save your life.  Video from ABC news

Table of Contents 

Stroke 

What to do if you crash in water

Kids Safety

Heart Attack 

Hyperthermia 

Star of life

Be a live Saver

Distracted Driving 

fire EXTINGUISHERS

                                             KEEP OUR KIDS SAFE

On average, 37 children die from heat-related deaths after being trapped inside vehicles. Even the best of parents or caregivers can unknowingly leave a sleeping baby in a car; and the end result can be injury or even death.HOW WE CAN PROTECT CHILDREN FROM DYING IN HOT CARS. www.kidsandcars.org is a great web page for resources how kids get hurt in cars, how to save lives and much more.

       Warning Signs of a Heart Attack

               by American Heart Association

 

Don’t wait to get help if you experience any of these heart attack warning signs. Although some heart attacks are sudden and intense, most start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Pay attention to your body — and call 911 if you feel:

  • Chest discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.
     

  • Discomfort in other areas of the upper body. Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach. 
     

  • Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort. 
     

  • Other signs may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.

  • for more information go to http://www.heart.org

Hyperthermia 

Hyperthermia is the condition of having a higher-than-normal body temperature that lingers. It is most common during the summer months. Follow the links below to find WebMD's comprehensive coverage about what hyperthermia is as well as symptoms, causes, treatments, prevention, and more.

Heat-related illness (hyperthermia) definition and facts

 

  • Hyperthermia is overheating of the body.

  • Heat-related illness occurs as a result of heat exposure.

  • Heat-related illnesses include

  • Heat stroke is the most severe form of heat-related illness, and requires immediate medical attention.

  • Certain individuals, such as the elderly, infants and young children, the obese, outdoor workers, and those with chronic medical conditions are at increased risk for developing heat-related illness.

  • Signs and symptoms of heat-related illness vary based on the condition, but may include

  • Treatment for heat-related illness generally includes moving the individual out of the hot environment, implementing cooling measures as needed, rest, and rehydration.

  • Prevention of heat-related illness is best accomplished through proper planning and preparation, such as increasing fluid intake, wearing appropriate clothing and sunscreen, remaining in a cool environment, acclimating yourself to the hot environment, and using common sense.

 for more information MedicineNet.com

The Definition of "Star of life"

             25 Shocking Distracted Driving Statistics

                                 by http://distracteddriveraccidents.com

  • Over 2.5 million people in the U.S. are involved in road accidents each year. The population of the US is just 318.9 million. At this rate, the American people could be extinct in two human lifespans. This is an astounding number of traffic accidents.

  • Of these, 1.6 million have a cell phone involved in them. That’s 64% of all the road accidents in the United States. Over half the road accidents in the States have cell phones involved, and if this doesn’t make you realize just how potent it is, what will?

  • 37,000+ people die in automobile crashes in the U.S every year

  • Every year, about 421,000 people are injured in crashes that have involved a driver who was distracted in some way.

  • Each year, over 330,000 accidents caused by texting while driving lead to severe injuries. This means that over 78% of all distracted drivers are distracted because they have been texting while driving.

  • 1 out of 4 car accidents in the US are caused by texting while driving.

  • Texting and driving is 6 times more likely to get you in an accident than drunk driving. That’s right, it is actually safer for someone to get wasted and get behind the wheel than to text and do it.

  • It takes an average of three seconds after a driver’s mind is taken off the road for any road accident to occur. This is the bare minimum amount of time it takes, and it is surprisingly small. Three seconds is the time it takes to turn your ignition when starting your car.

  • Reading a text message while driving successfully distracts a driver for a minimum of five seconds each time. This means that the chances of an accident occurring while reading a text is extremely high indeed.

  • The average speed in the US is about 55mph. Taking five seconds to read a text in this time means that the driver travels the length of a football field without looking at the road, or being distracted. There are so many vehicles on the road now that this means there is a huge chance of something terrible happening in this distance.

  • When you text while driving, the time that you spend with your eyes off the road increases by about 400%. It is already dangerous enough to be distracted by NATURE while driving. So why make things 4 times as bad by texting?

  • The chances of a crash because of any reason is increased by 23 times when you are texting. Even if the crash is another driver’s fault, you will probably have been able to avoid it if you had been looking at the road instead of the phone.

  • When you compare this to the 2.8 times more risk that dialing a number on a phone imparts, you know that you are playing with fire.

  • Every day, 11 teenagers die because they were texting while driving.

  • 94% of teenagers understand the consequences of texting and driving, but 35% of them admitted that they do it anyway.

  • Of all the teenagers ever involved in fatal accidents every year, 21% were using a cell phone at the time of the accident.

  • Teen drivers have a 400% higher chance of being in a car crash when texting while driving than adults.

  • 25% of teens respond to at least one text while driving, every single time.

  • 10% of adults and 20% of teenagers have admitted that they have entire conversations over text message platforms while driving.

  • 82% of American teenagers own a cell phone, and use it regularly to call and text message.

  • 52% of these talk on the phone while driving, and 32% text on the road.

  • When polled, 77% of adults and 55% of teenage drivers say that they can easily manage texting while driving.

  • When teens text while they drive, they veer off lane 10% of their total drive time.

  • A study at the University of Utah found out that the reaction time for a teen using a cell phone is the same as that of a 70 year old who isn’t using one.

  • 48% of kids in their younger teenage years have been in a car while the driver was texting. Over 1600 children in the same age group are killed each year because of crashes involving texters.

                              Safe Driving Tips

Do not use a cell phone while driving! Pull over to make a phone call!

 

Do not text while driving! If you need to text, pull over to text!

 

Do not apply makeup while driving!

 

Adjust your radio before you start driving!

 

Input your GPS settings before you drive!

Fire extinguishers

A portable fire extinguisher can save lives and property by putting out a small fire or containing it until the fire department arrives; but portable extinguishers have limitations. Because fire grows and spreads so rapidly, the #1 priority for residents is to get out safely.

 

                             SAFETY TIPS

  • Use a portable fire extinguisher when the fire is confined to a small area, such as a wastebasket, and is not growing; everyone has exited the building; the fire department has been called or is being called; and the room is not filled with smoke.

  • To operate a fire extinguisher, remember the word PASS:

  •  

    Pull the pin. Hold the extinguisher with the nozzle pointing away from you, and release the locking mechanism.

    Aim low. Point the extinguisher at the base of the fire.
  • Squeeze the lever slowly and evenly.

  • Sweep the nozzle from side-to-side.

         more information go to nfpa.org

  • Class A: freely burning, combustible solid materials such as wood or paper

  • Class B: flammable liquid or gas

  • Class C: energized electrical fire (energized electrical source serves as the ignitor of a class A or B fire – if electrical source is removed, it is no longer a class C fire)

  • Class D: metallic fire (titanium, zirconium, magnesium, sodium)

  • Class K: cooking fires – animal or vegetable oils or fats

Regardless of the type of fire, there will always be the same four elements present:

  1. Fuel

  2. Heat

  3. Oxygen

  4. Chain Reaction

The theory behind portable fire extinguishers is that the fire can be extinguished by removing any one or more of these four elements.

For each class of fire, the fuel, heat source and chain reaction varies, which is why there must be different types of fire extinguishers depending on the class of fire. For instance, while a class A fire can be safely extinguished with water, a class C fire cannot, as water would conduct the electricity and risk harm to the operator.

6 Types of Extinguishers

Now that you have a basic understanding of the various types of fire and why different extinguishers are necessary, 6 main types of fire extinguishers and their uses will be discussed:

1. ABC POWDER FIRE EXTINGUISHER

An ABC powder fire extinguisher has numerous advantages as it is a multi-purpose extinguisher and is therefore one of the most common extinguishers to have on hand.

A powder extinguisher sprays a very fine chemical powder composed most commonly of monoammonium phosphate. This acts to blanket the fire and suffocate it.

Powder extinguishers are effective for class A, B and C fires, since it is not an electrical conductor and since it can effectively break the chain reaction in a liquid or gas fire, something a water extinguisher cannot do.

2. CARBON DIOXIDE FIRE EXTINGUISHER

A carbon dioxide fire extinguisher (CO2) is one of the cleanest types of extinguishers to use as it leaves no residue and requires no cleanup.

The CO2 extinguisher does exactly that – extinguishes CO2. By doing so, it removes oxygen from the fire, effectively suffocating it of oxygen. It is perfect for use on class B fires that involve flammable liquids and on electrical fires.

3. WET CHEMICAL FIRE EXTINGUISHER

The wet chemical extinguisher is a specialized type primarily focused on class K fires, those involving cooking media such as animal and vegetable fats or oils.

These extinguishers contain a solution composed of potassium that effectively launches a two-pronged assault on fires.

First, the liquid mist it sprays acts to cool the fire. Second, due to the chemical reaction of the solution with the cooking medium, a thick soap-like substance forms, sealing the surface of the liquid to prevent re-ignition.

The wet chemical extinguisher, then, is ideal for a kitchen setting and class K fires. However, it can also be effective for class A fires where a material such as wood or paper has caught fire.

4. WATER MIST FIRE EXTINGUISHER

The most versatile of the set, the water mist extinguisher, uses a newer technology that works across most classes of fire.

This type of extinguisher releases microscopic water molecules that fight the fire on a variety of levels. First, because so much water is dispersed in such a microscopic fog-like form, the level of oxygen in the air is decreased, which helps to suffocate the fire.

Second, the water particles are drawn to the fire and, as water always does, acts to cool it, reducing the temperature.

Finally, and perhaps what is most unique about the water mist extinguishers, is that the water has been de-ionized (the minerals have been removed). As a result, it can actually be used on electrical fires, as the de-ionized water will not act as a conductor, as well as on burning liquids/gases that a standard water extinguisher could not be applied to.

Thus, a water mist extinguisher is safe and effective for use on classes A, B, C and K fires.

5. FOAM FIRE EXTINGUISHER

Foam fire extinguishers are suitable for class A and the flammable liquids of class B, though not effective for gaseous fires. 

They spray a type of foam that expands when it hits the air and blankets the fire. This blanket prevents the vapors from rising off the liquid to feed the fire, thus starving it of fuel. Also, because the foam is mixed with water, it has a cooling effect as well.

Foam extinguishers are some of the best for liquid fires, such as gasoline fires, but can also be used on Class A fires involving solid combustibles like wood.

6. CLEAN AGENT FIRE EXTINGUISHER

A clean agent fire extinguisher is a type of gaseous fire suppression. Stored in its liquid form, when it is sprayed and hits the air, it converts to its gas form which is non-conductive, safe for use while humans are present, leaves no residue, and has a very short atmospheric lifetime, making it eco-friendly.

The gas, often composed of Halon, extinguishes fire by reducing the oxygen levels and impeding the chain reaction. Because it is non-conductive and so clean, it is ideal for rooms or businesses filled with electrical and computer equipment. They are most commonly used for class B and C fires.

TO REPORT AN EMERGENCY CALL 9-1-1

WELCOME TO THE

HALSEY-SHEDD FIRE DISTRICT

Main Station:                    halseyfireprevention@rtinet

740 West 2nd Street

Halsey, OR 97348

(541) 369-2419

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